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Welcome to the

Carbonate Reservoir Group

The Carbonate Reservoir Group at the Institute of Petroleum Engineering is world-renowned for its applied and fundamental research on improving the predictability of hydrocarbon recovery from carbonate reservoirs.

Previous Projects

Fundamental Controls of Flow in Carbonates (FC)2

Sponsors

ExxonMobil Upstream Research

 

Investigators

Sebastian Geiger

 

Research

(FC)2 was an international and interdisciplinary research alliance that sponsored 9 universities in Europe and 1 in the USA. Heriot-Watt University was one of its founding members. (FC)2 tackled global challenges from reservoir geology to reservoir simulation. The focus of the research at Heriot-Watt University was the analysis of IOR and EOR processes at the pore-, core- and outcrop-scale, which included a series of laboratory experiments (e.g. X-Ray CT imaging and EOR core-floods). (FC)2 has supported 4 PhD students and one visiting scholar at Heriot-Watt University.

FC2

Novel Mathematical Approaches for Multiscale Modelling of Three-Phase Porous Media Flow

Sponsors

Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

 

Investigators

Sebastian Geiger, Rink van Dijke, Gabriel Lord (Department of Mathematics, Heriot-Watt University), Dugald Duncan (Department of Mathematics, Heriot-Watt University), Lubomir Banas (Department of Mathematics, Heriot-Watt University)

 

Research

This project explored the feasibility of novel mathematical approaches for multiscale modelling of three-phase (i.e. oil, gas, water) porous media flow, crossing traditional boundaries between petroleum engineering, physics, and applied mathematics. A key aim was to investigate if a suitable alternative to three-phase Darcy's law can be developed in such a way that it can be solved in the mathematically robust and efficient manner that is required for successful use in daily engineering applications. An alternative is required because Darcy's law for three-phase flow is intrinsically not valid in certain flow regimes, that is when one or more phases move as discontinuous blobs and ganglia. Yet it is exactly this situation that is of most interest to engineering, for example when predicting the migration of residual oil in a depleted hydrocarbon reservoir.

epsrc

Modelling reactive transport at the pore-scale in carbonates

Sponsors

Conselho Nacional de Desinvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnologico

 

Investigators

Luiz de Lima, Sebastian Geiger, Rink van Dijke, Zeyun Jiang

 

Research

The aim of this project was to analyse the evolution of the statistical properties of the pore-network in a carbonate rock during dissolution and precipitation reactions. Carbonate rock samples where flooded with CO2 and the pore-space was imaged pre- and post-reaction. Change in pore-space topology were quantified using image analysis and in-house pore-network modelling software that measure statistical properties such as the specific Euler number or coordination number.

CNPq

Improved Simulation of Fractured and Faulted Reservoirs (Phase 3)

Sponsors

ExxonMobil, Total, Saudi Aramco, OMV, ConocoPhillips, Statoil

 

Investigators

Sebastian Geiger, Stephan Matthai (Montan University of Leoben), and John-Paul Latham (Imperial College London)

 

Research

This was a joint research project between Montan University of Leoben, Imperial College London, and Heriot-Watt University and is facilited by ITF. It had the overarching goal to improve the simulation of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs (NFR) in three fundamental ways: (1) Continuous improvement of the physical realism of the Discrete Fracture and Matrix (DFM) simulators. (2) Support of a novel upscaling workflow for NFR with a user-friendly GUI-driven software, improved robustness, and speed-up of the necessary computations with better time-stepping algorithms and code parallelisation. (3) Application of the new tools for investigating small- and sector-scale displacement patterns resulting from the interplay of gravitational, viscous and capillary forces when secondary recovery methods are applied to NFRs.

itf logo

Thermally enhanced spontaneous imbibition

Sponsors

China University of Petroleum Beijing

 

Investigators

Qing Wang and Sebastian Geiger

 

Research

This project aimed to understand, quantify, and model the fundamental mechanisms occurring during thermally enhanced spontaneous imbibition in fractured heavy oil reservoirs. A series of laboratory experiments have been performed, which were analysed using numerical simulations and scaling groups. The ultimate aim was to develop more robust modelling approaches for simulating spontaneous imbibition during heavy oil production at the reservoir simulation grid-block scale.

CUP